Paul Hastings Tower in Los Angeles

Photo of Paul Hastings Tower in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of Paul Hastings Tower in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
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Photo of Paul Hastings Tower in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of Paul Hastings Tower in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of Paul Hastings Tower in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz

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Paul Hastings Tower
Formerly:Bank of America Tower
Formerly:Arco Tower

515 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, California, Downtown Los Angeles 90071
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Paul Hastings Tower is one half of a pair of identical twin towers near the western edge of downtown Los Angeles. It takes the form of a large dark grey monolith, interrupted several times by horizontal black bands. These black bands are the mechanical levels of the building, where air conditioning, elevator, and other mechanical equipment is housed.

Because of these bands, the buildings are visually broken up into segments, making them easier on the eyes, and less imposing even though they are nearly 700 feet tall.

This building is responsible for both making history, and destroying it. As part of City National Plaza, it was the first major commercial business development in downtown Los Angeles. But in order for the plaza to be built, the historic Richfield Building, regarded as a local landmark and an art deco masterpiece, had to be razed.

Quick Facts
Timeline
  • July, 2002: This building was renamed the Paul Hastings Tower
Notes
  • The building is named for the law firm Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker.
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method='post' action='/Building.php?ID=3656#Rate'>Current rating:50% 70%  name='Rating' id='Rating' value='Praise' class='Plain'> name='Rating' id='Rating' value='Raze' class='Plain'>
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There are three comments.

  Joined ARCO in summer of 1972 in NYC and moved to LA when the corp office moved in Sept 1972.Worked on the 41st floor. Great building to work in. The center building was a three story BOA banking center.There were several fine restaurants in the underground between the Towers. Parked at the J2 garage across the street for $20 per month. The Bonaventure Hotel area was a dirt parking lot for $15/monthIf my memory is correct, the only way to get to the 51st floor which was Mr. Anderson, CEO and Thornton Bradshaw, President office was by special elevator from the 50th floor. You could not get to 51 from the lobby.Great place and great memories of the people at ARCO in the early 70s when the Alaska Pipeline was being built.

Joe Kubit - Thursday, July 24th, 2014 @ 7:31pm  

  As an addenda to my previous post., I should correct my statement that the 50th and 51st floors had higher ceilings than the rest of the floors. The ceilings were higher than the regular working floors, but the 37th floor (which contained ARCO's banqueting and meeting rooms) also had high ceilings, as did the 13th floor. The 52nd floor was windowless and used for storage only.

tovangar2 - Saturday, November 10th, 2012 @ 11:19pm  

  Originally built as the AtlanticRichfieldCompany (ARCO) headquarters. The entire complex was called the AtlanticRichfieldPlaza. The other tower was occupied by Bank of America as was the two-story "jewelbox" building between the towers. Below grade, level "A" contained parking and levels "B" and "C" made up a shopping and restaurant concourse which extended under the entire city block.The greenish black granite which clads the towers was quarried in Canada and shipped to Italy to be polished before being forwarded to Los Angeles.Robert O. Anderson, founder and chairman of AtlanticRichfieldCompany made the decision to demolish the Richfield Building, although originally it was planned to build a single large new building with many setbacks on the rest of the block to "cradle" the Richfield Building. When that was rejected plans were made to line the central core of the lobby of the new tower with the gold terracotta figures that graced the exterior of the Richfield Building. However it was thought by the certain decision-makers that the figures looked too "crude" at such close range.It was said at the time that all the decorative elements from the Richfield Building were donated to Santa Barbara (UCSB?/SBMA?) but I am unable to confirm this.Some bronze elevator door panels were kept by ARCO and installed as a 16' floor to ceiling decorative screen in the 51st floor executive offices. When ARCO was taken over by BP, those panels were donated to the Los Angeles Conservancy.All art and design decisions were handled by Herbert Bayer (1900-1985, Austrian-American), Bauhaus Master and R.O. Anderson's close friend. The 51 floor executive offices (there were just six offices for the top execs, plus the Boardroom) were designed by George Kaneko of Kaneko/Laff and further offices, for the remaining executives, were designed by Anthony X. Rodriguez on the 49th and 50th floors.(Notice in the photo that the 50th and 51st floors had higher ceilings than the rest of the floors.)

tovangar2 - Saturday, November 10th, 2012 @ 9:41pm  

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