One Bunker Hill in Los Angeles

Photo of One Bunker Hill in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of One Bunker Hill in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
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Photo of One Bunker Hill in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation
Photo of One Bunker Hill in Los Angeles, California
Photograph © Wayne Lorentz/Artefaqs Corporation

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One Bunker Hill
Formerly:Southern California Edison BuildingAt one time, this was an architectural beacon on Bunker Hill. Now it is a art deco jewel overshadowed by its taller, flashier neighbors.

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At one time, this was an architectural beacon on Bunker Hill. Now it is a art deco jewel overshadowed by its taller, flashier neighbors.

One Bunker Hill began life as the headquarters of the local electric company, Southern California Edison. At the time it was heralded for the engineering that was intended to make it earthquake resistant. Almost a hundred years and thousands of earthquakes later, the building continues to stand strong.

Not surprisingly, since this building was commissioned for the electric company, it was one of the first all-electric buildings in the West.

Quick Facts
Statistics
  • Floor space: 242,200 square feet
  • Elevators: 7
  • Parking spaces: 125
Notes
  • Some web sites claim this building has 14 stories. The owner of the building says it's 12. Realtors say it's 13.
Did You Know?
  • The lobby is decorated with more than two dozen types of marble.
Look For
  • Three reliefs over the main entrance. They were done by Merrell Gage and represent hydroelectricity, light, and power.
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Your Thoughts

There is one comment.

  Notice the unfortunate two-story addition to the facade. This was added over the old Hope Place right-of-way, the small street which this building used to front on. W Fifth Street was extended in 1925 by cutting away the southern slope of Bunker Hill, leaving Hope Place on a cliff top. Eventually, with the building of Library Tower, old Hope Place was abandoned and re-routed behind the buildings to again join Grand Avenue with Hope Street.

tovangar2 - Tuesday, November 13th, 2012 @ 3:07pm  

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